PROFESSIONALS

Melanie A. Chernoff

Melanie Chernoff uses her B.S. degree in physics to counsel clients across many disciplines from toy cars to interleaved data schemas.  Her practice focuses on claim analysis, freedom to operate opinions, and patent prosecution and litigation support in the areas of legal research, discovery, and technical analysis.

It was during her time teaching high school physics that Melanie learned to break down complex scientific ideas, such as Lorentz transformations, into easy to understand concepts.  Her passion for simply explaining complex matters paved the way for her to become a patent attorney.  Melanie uses her teaching experience to synthesize effective explanations of technical and legal concepts in an easy‑to‑understand manner.  This facilitates communication with judges, adversaries, and clients. 

During law school Melanie was a research assistant in the Intellectual Property Law Clinic at Rutgers Law School.  Melanie advised law clinic clients in many areas of intellectual property as exemplified by undertaking trademark and patentability searches, writing trademark and patent opinion letters, and drafting patent applications. 

Melanie was a Managing Editor for the Computer and Technology Law Journal, in which she published “One‑To‑One Or Slim To None: New Jersey’s Chances Of Affording A One‑To‑One Educational Initiative.”  Her role as Managing Editor had led her to appreciate the finer details, ensuring that the final product is in its best form possible before submitting it.  She was also President of the Intellectual Property Law Society.

Melanie Chernoff uses her B.S. degree in physics to counsel clients across many disciplines from toy cars to interleaved data schemas.  Her practice focuses on claim analysis, freedom to operate opinions, and patent prosecution and litigation support in the areas of legal research, discovery, and technical analysis.

It was during her time teaching high school physics that Melanie learned to break down complex scientific ideas, such as Lorentz transformations, into easy to understand concepts.  Her passion for simply explaining complex matters paved the way for her to become a patent attorney.  Melanie uses her teaching experience to synthesize effective explanations of technical and legal concepts in an easy‑to‑understand manner.  This facilitates communication with judges, adversaries, and clients. 

During law school Melanie was a research assistant in the Intellectual Property Law Clinic at Rutgers Law School.  Melanie advised law clinic clients in many areas of intellectual property as exemplified by undertaking trademark and patentability searches, writing trademark and patent opinion letters, and drafting patent applications. 

Melanie was a Managing Editor for the Computer and Technology Law Journal, in which she published “One‑To‑One Or Slim To None: New Jersey’s Chances Of Affording A One‑To‑One Educational Initiative.”  Her role as Managing Editor had led her to appreciate the finer details, ensuring that the final product is in its best form possible before submitting it.  She was also President of the Intellectual Property Law Society.

  • Overview

    Melanie Chernoff uses her B.S. degree in physics to counsel clients across many disciplines from toy cars to interleaved data schemas.  Her practice focuses on claim analysis, freedom to operate opinions, and patent prosecution and litigation support in the areas of legal research, discovery, and technical analysis.

    It was during her time teaching high school physics that Melanie learned to break down complex scientific ideas, such as Lorentz transformations, into easy to understand concepts.  Her passion for simply explaining complex matters paved the way for her to become a patent attorney.  Melanie uses her teaching experience to synthesize effective explanations of technical and legal concepts in an easy‑to‑understand manner.  This facilitates communication with judges, adversaries, and clients. 

    During law school Melanie was a research assistant in the Intellectual Property Law Clinic at Rutgers Law School.  Melanie advised law clinic clients in many areas of intellectual property as exemplified by undertaking trademark and patentability searches, writing trademark and patent opinion letters, and drafting patent applications. 

    Melanie was a Managing Editor for the Computer and Technology Law Journal, in which she published “One‑To‑One Or Slim To None: New Jersey’s Chances Of Affording A One‑To‑One Educational Initiative.”  Her role as Managing Editor had led her to appreciate the finer details, ensuring that the final product is in its best form possible before submitting it.  She was also President of the Intellectual Property Law Society.

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