PROFESSIONALS

Vaibhav M. Sharma

Vaibhav Sharma’s undergraduate background –  a B.S. degree with dual majors in Physics and Mathematics – allows him to quickly understand core concepts in the IP space.  He is able to provide counsel to clients effectively in emerging technologies, such as autonomous vehicles, machine learning, and cloud computing.

During law school, Vaibhav was part of the TI:GER program at Emory, where he worked with graduate students in law, business, science and engineering on both legal and business aspects of start-up companies. During the program he worked on projects in the fields of computer vision technology, water purification devices and predictive analytics for railways. Vaibhav gained valuable experience translating sophisticated technical ideas into practical applications, such as pitching ideas to venture capital or angel investors, or communicating with consumers to understand the market.

Prior to starting his career in law, Vaibhav was involved in physics research utilizing ultra-low temperature techniques to examine super-solids at Rutgers University, finite-element-method simulations of mechanical cantilevers at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, and the development of quantum sensors at Harvard.

His cases have involved software, consumer electronics and mechanical devices in fields such as semiconductors, computer image processing, digital content protection systems, and consumer electronic software and hardware systems. Vaibhav is also experienced in inter partes review proceedings. His prosecution experience involves technologies for automotive parts, software, and networking systems.

Vaibhav’s undergraduate background –  a B.S. degree with dual majors in Physics and Mathematics – enables him to quickly understand core concepts in the IP space. This enables him to provide counsel to clients effectively in emerging technologies, such as autonomous vehicles, machine learning, and cloud computing.

During law school, Vaibhav was part of the TI:GER program at Emory, where he worked with graduate students in law, business, science and engineering on both legal and business aspects of start-up companies. During the program he worked on projects in the fields of computer vision technology, water purification devices and predictive analytics for railways. Vaibhav gained valuable experience translating sophisticated technical ideas into practical applications, such as when pitching ideas to venture capital or angel investors, or communicating with consumers to understand the market.

Prior to starting his career in law, Vaibhav was involved in physics research utilizing ultra-low temperature techniques to examine super-solids at Rutgers University, finite-element-method simulations of mechanical cantilevers at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, and the development of quantum sensors at Harvard.

His cases have involved software, consumer electronics and mechanical devices in fields such as semiconductors, computer image processing, digital content protection systems, and consumer electronic software and hardware systems. Vaibhav is also experienced in inter partes review proceedings. Vaibhav also has prosecution experience involving technologies for automotive parts, software, and networking systems.

  • Overview

    Vaibhav Sharma’s undergraduate background –  a B.S. degree with dual majors in Physics and Mathematics – allows him to quickly understand core concepts in the IP space.  He is able to provide counsel to clients effectively in emerging technologies, such as autonomous vehicles, machine learning, and cloud computing.

    During law school, Vaibhav was part of the TI:GER program at Emory, where he worked with graduate students in law, business, science and engineering on both legal and business aspects of start-up companies. During the program he worked on projects in the fields of computer vision technology, water purification devices and predictive analytics for railways. Vaibhav gained valuable experience translating sophisticated technical ideas into practical applications, such as pitching ideas to venture capital or angel investors, or communicating with consumers to understand the market.

    Prior to starting his career in law, Vaibhav was involved in physics research utilizing ultra-low temperature techniques to examine super-solids at Rutgers University, finite-element-method simulations of mechanical cantilevers at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin, and the development of quantum sensors at Harvard.

    His cases have involved software, consumer electronics and mechanical devices in fields such as semiconductors, computer image processing, digital content protection systems, and consumer electronic software and hardware systems. Vaibhav is also experienced in inter partes review proceedings. His prosecution experience involves technologies for automotive parts, software, and networking systems.

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